How Warby Parker (And Others) Use Lead Quizzes To Grow Revenue

What makes a good lead quiz? In this post, we’ll show you four examples of lead quizzes and show you how they can be used to sky rocket your leads.

Lead Quiz Examples

Having recently released our new scoring feature (which allows you to create customized lead scoring quizzes with Fieldboom), we thought we’d spend some time looking at how other companies – including Warby Parker and BACKPACKER – are using lead quizzes to significantly grow their revenue.

If you’ve never thought of using lead quizzes to capture leads before, this article will provide you with clear examples you can emulate to get started. We’ll also talk about the significant benefits lead quizzes can bring you in terms of increased lead volume.

Still on the fence? Here are three good reasons to try out a quiz for capturing leads:

1) They create a lasting impression

A good quiz can build anticipation. When they make a user think, it helps create the impression that you (the quiz creator) are the authority, and that they have something to learn from you.

2) They’re personal

Quizzes offer the opportunity to capture specific information about the lead — information you can use to suggest specific products or services.

3) They can help qualify leads

With Fieldboom’s scoring feature, you can use lead quizzes to prioritize leads.

What makes a good lead quiz? In this post, I’ll show you examples of quizzes — including what we think works well and what they could’ve done better.

We’ll look at:

  • 2 B2C Examples
  • 2 B2B Examples

At the end, I’ll finish up with Fieldboom’s not-so-secret strategy for getting even better results out of lead quizzes.

(Note: It takes about 10 minutes to create a personalized lead quiz with Fieldboom. It’s free to get started.

1. A Share-Worthy Quiz (B2C)

In 2016, Backpacker Magazine created a quiz that has been shared over 2,000 times. Let’s look at why.

Lead Quizzes should be shareable and customizable.

The quiz is optimized for a specific audience — without limiting the audience

Who is going to take this quiz? People interested in backpacking or exploring, of course! But, from the beginning, the quiz allows for someone to be a beginner or an expert.

Lead quizzes shouldn't limit anyone in the audience from participating

It’s short and sweet

The quiz is only four questions long (and tells you so).

Lead quizzes should show you how far along you are and how many questions you have to go.

It gathers information that can be used for multiple offers

Allowing a user to select multiple options gives you multiple opportunities to come back to them with new offers. In this case, it helps users think about what they care about.

As a backpacker taking this quiz, I had to think about what I cared most about experiencing. Naturally, I started thinking about all the trips I want to take in the future! That’s what made a lasting impression on me.

Select all that apply: I care most about experiencing... and click all that apply.

The offer is relevant to the quiz

The offer, an online Thru-Hiking class, is relevant to the content of the quiz. This is extremely important in using quizzes for leads.

However, there is one thing I think they could’ve done better here:

They could’ve offered a different class depending on the person’s responses. Even though I’d told them I was an experienced hiker in the first question, they still offered Thru-Hiking 101 at the end.

I’m less likely to sign up for this class than I would be an intermediate or expert class or resource, which they totally have.

Thru-Hiking 101

The results are shareable

The quiz is optimized to be shared easily with results that are worth sharing. I wonder who in my network wants to go to France, Italy, and Switzerland with me…

Lead quiz result: Tour du Mont Blanc (France/Italy/Switzerland)

2. A Highly Personalized Quiz (B2C)

I found this ad from Warby Parker in my Gmail account offering to help me find the perfect frames.

A highly personalized quiz

What’s good about this quiz?

The quiz tells you what the offer is going to be

The homepage of the quiz sets up the offer for you. They could’ve set it up to say “find the perfect lens frames for your face” or something more generic.

Instead, quiz takers know that they can select five frames to try at home for free. This builds investment in completing the quiz. It also offers quiz takers a more practical perspective while answering their questions.
 Find frames to try at home with our quiz

It’s Personalized

Since Warby Parker isn’t just collecting emails, each question has to be more and more personalized, using answer piping (taking a previous answer and using it as part of the next question’s text).

No matter what you’re selling, whether it’s a product or a service, personalization is always a good thing. You can use this same level of personalization to gather information for future offers regardless of who you’re targeting.

Customized quizzes target a specific person

They explained the deal in more detail before showing the results

By answering a few questions in more detail, both parties get what they are looking for.

Even the results allowed for more personalization

The results gave color options. In addition, they give quiz takers the choice to start a favorites collection.

One thing they could’ve considered here is an additional offer for an email capture. Not ready to try frames at home? How about a 20% off coupon when you visit Warby Parker in person?

Their quiz allows you to see personalized recommendations based upon your answers.

(Note: It takes about 10 minutes to create a personalized lead quiz with Fieldboom. It’s free to get started.) 

3. A Journey Quiz (B2B)

Bastian Ernst at Wildaudience offers marketing services and uses a lead quiz to learn more about individuals and companies that want to work with him.

Starting with his homepage, he asks visitors to take a journey with him.

He asks his readers to "take a journey with him"

Bastian’s tactic is a gamble. You go through multiple pages of scrolling text to get to the lead quiz, three clicks away from his homepage.

What’s more, once you click on this “continue” button and start the journey, the other navigation options disappear. But those who make their way to the quiz are already invested in the process.

Homepage shows the navigation process, which is then removed on "journey pages"

The first question gives quiz takers a sense of Wild Audience’s offerings

On the very first question, the quiz taker learns more about what Wild Audience offers, but the reverse is true as well. From your response, Bastian learns which product or service you’re most interested in.

Best, he allows quiz takers to have a specific goal in mind — or not.

Lead Quizzes: Wild Audience

Questions 2 and 3 create a customer profile

If Bastian is more interested in certain types and sizes of businesses, these questions can also be used to score leads.

Lead Quizzes: Wild Audience 2

Lead Quizzes: Wild Audience 3

The last two questions continue building a profile based on the potential customer’s goals and what services they’d be interested in.  

What could Bastian have done better? To me, the questions didn’t seem to build on each other. For instance, based on a user’s answer to question #4, the following question could’ve asked what the customer’s revenue goal is or what their niche is.

Lead Quizzes: Wild Audience 4

Lead Quizzes: Wild Audience 5

Confirmation page contains an additional offer

At the end of the quiz, Wild Audience uses the email confirmation page to offer additional value, keeping users engaged.

Wild Audience Lead Quiz contains a confirmation of email sent and additional product offer

4. A Poorly Executed Quiz (B2B)

Marketing firm WeGrowth set up a quiz to attract marketers. Quiz takers answer 14 questions about their approach to marketing and, in return, see how much their marketing skills might be worth.

It’s a good idea with, sadly, poor execution. We’ll show you some of the things they could’ve done better so you don’t make the same mistakes.

A poorly designed lead quiz

No guidance or instructions?

From the start, it’s unclear whether test-takers are supposed to select one service or if it’s multiple choice. (By the way, it’s not. Choosing an option takes you to the next question.)

Where are the instructions?

Lead Quizzes: The first question - it isn't multiple choice, just poorly made.

Really poor design

After some investigation, I found the instructions. What appeared to be a test without instruction is really just a quiz with really poor design: white font on a white background.

Lead Quizzes should be designed properly along with being readable.

They didn’t use response-based logic

All responses take you to the same next question, meaning the quiz wasn’t personalized at all using answer piping or skip logic.

Like Wild Audience, WeGrowth missed the opportunity to dig into their leads’ knowledge or wishes.

Lead Quizzes: Allow for open-ended responses

None of the questions allowed for open-ended responses

You can learn a lot by giving quiz takers the opportunity to speak for themselves, such as what language they use or what you might be missing on the quiz. This was missing in Wild Audience’s quiz, as well.

So how do you create a better lead quiz?

Whether you’re a well-established business or you’re working toward your first 100 customers, Fieldboom uses advanced features — such as skip logic, answer piping, scoring and custom calls-to-action — to ensure that your form is optimized for not only capturing and qualifying leads, but also recommending the right product or service to those leads once they’ve filled in your lead quiz. 

It takes about 10 minutes to create a personalized lead quiz with Fieldboom. It’s free to get started.

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EJ left a career in UX/UI to write full-time. She believes in user-centered design and advocating for diversity in the tech field. Follow EJ on Twitter @whatiwritewith